Target formats

Depending on the source document file type, SensusAccess supports a wide range of target formats to meet the requirements of different users and usage in different situations. SensusAccess includes the following main workflows:

Subject to subscription options, SensusAccess furthermore has support for the following optional workflows:

MP3 audio

The MP3 format is well-known to users and most users will have some kind of device that is capable of playing back an MP3 audio file, such as their smartphone, tablet or computer. MP3 files can be used by many different user groups and in many different situations, e.g., for studying whilst commuting or doing workouts, or for repetition.

The downside with MP3 is that origination and navigation can be difficult because of the linear nature of the audio since MP3 is just one long sequence of audio. Hence, MP3 may not be the greatest format if it is important to go to particular pages or locate particular chapters. In such situations, structured audio books may be a better target format.

For more information about the various MP3 audio options offered by SensusAccess, please visit MP3 audio features.

The MP3 audio conversion features of SensusAccess are further explained in Module 3 of the SensusAccess e-learning course (opens new page).

Structured audio books

The traditional format for structured audio formats is a format called DAISY. DAISY is a disability-type format and dates back to the late 1980’s. The DAISY format is – fortunately – being superseded with a mainstream format in the form of an e-book with a synchronised audio overlay on top. SensusAccess supports both of these structured audio formats and in terms of functionality they offer similar functionality: The text and audio are synchronised, making it possible to highlight the text as it is being read back to the reader. Furthermore, the reader have a wide range of navigational aids available and can navigate using chapter and section headings, pages and numbers, and bookmarks.

For more information about structured audio books in DAISY format, please visit DAISY features. For more information about e-books with synchronised audio overlays, please visit e-book features.

SensusAccess requires source documents for conversion into structured audio books in either DAISY or EPUB3 to comply with formal accessibility guidelines. The advanced e-book conversion features are further explained in Module 7 of the SensusAccess e-learning course (opens new page). The DAISY conversion features are further explained in Module 8 of the SensusAccess e-learning course (opens new page). Design and creation of documents that comply with the formal accessibility requirements are further explained in Module 6 of the SensusAccess e-learning course (opens new page).

E-books

E-books in proper e-book formats such as EPUB and Mobi Pocket can be reflown to fit the display even when the text is scaled up. Furthermore, you can substitute fonts, change background and foreground colours, switch the scrolling direction, change the line spacing, adjust the brightness and increase the contrast of e-books. These possibilities make e-books great for people with low vision and can also be advantageous for readers with dyslexia. SensusAccess can be used to produce e-books in the main e-book formats (EPUB, EPUB3 and Mobi Pocket) to support users with a wide range of e-readers, tablets, smartphones and computers.

 For more information about e-books support in SensusAccess, please visit e-book features.

The basic e-book conversion features of SensusAccess are further explained in Module 5 of the SensusAccess e-learning course (opens new page).

SensusAccess convert accessible documents into EPUB3 and EPUB3 with audio overlays. Source documents must be submitted in Word format and must comply with the formal accessibility requirements. The advanced e-book conversion features are further explained in Module 7 of the SensusAccess e-learning course (opens new page). Design and creation of documents that comply with the formal accessibility requirements are further explained in Module 6 of the SensusAccess e-learning course (opens new page).

Braille

Braille is the tactile reading and writing medium for many blind people. Since most Braille codes are based on a six-dot Braille figure with only 26 = 64 different combinations, Braille rely heavily on reuse of Braille characters for different purposes. As such, in Unified English Braille, a Braille code used widely in English-speaking countries, the same Braille character is used to represent an uppercase B, a lowercase b, the digit 2, the Greek letter β and the word ‘but’ depending on context and modifiers. Furthermore, many Braille codes use contractions for frequently used words and parts of words, thereby reducing the amount of text users have to read. For these and other reasons, there is not a one-to-one relationship between the alphabets of the sighted and the Braille codes in different parts of world. Consequently, written text needs to be transcribed into Braille in accordance with the Braille code that is applicable for the text (e.g., the natural language and required contraction level). Furthermore, the resulting Braille needs to be formatted and returned to the user in a technical Braille format that can be rendered correctly by the users Braille device.

SensusAccess can transcribe documents in accordance with a substantial number Braille codes including Unified English Braille, German Braille, Spanish Braille, French Braille and many more. SensusAccess can also format and return Braille documents ready to be embossed on Braille embossers, displayed on Braille displays connected to a computer or smartphone, or loaded on to a Braille notetaker.

For more information about Braille support in SensusAccess, please visit Braille features.

The Braille transcription features of SensusAccess are further explained in Module 9 of the SensusAccess e-learning course (opens new page).

Accessibility conversion

The accessibility conversion workflow of SensusAccess can be used to convert otherwise inaccessible or tricky documents into formats that are more accessible or easier to work with. Examples of inaccessible documents include image-only PDF documents obtained from publishers, journal papers retrieved from scientific databases, learning material in learning management systems or documents created by scanning. Other examples include documents digitised using the camera-function of a smartphone. Tricky documents could be a PowerPoint presentation with or without handout notes, which can pose rather challenging for users of screen readers. Other tricky documents include STEM material in TeX or LaTeX.

SensusAccess is not a formal document remediation service that warrants the formal compliance of converted documents. Rather, SensusAccess offers a fast and efficient means to convert inaccessible and tricky formats into a range of formats that are more accessible or easier for users to work with.

For formal compliance, please visit the SensusComply Remediation Portal (opens in new window). SensusComply is a high-quality, cost-efficient document remediation service for anyone with a need for accessible, compliant documents in any format, on any subject and in any language. With transparent pricing and fast turn-around, SensusComply offers remediation in accordance with international standards, including EN 301 549, WCAG 2.1 and PDF/UA. 

For more information about the automated document remediation features offered by SensusAccess, please visit document remediation features.

The document remediation features of SensusAccess is further explained in Module 4 of the SensusAccess e-learning course (opens new page).

Beeline Reader

Based on award-winning technology, BeeLine Reader promises to make reading on screen easier and faster, both for skilled readers and those with reading related-disabilities. Instead of using black text, BeeLine Reader uses eye-guiding color gradients, which pull the reader’s eyes through the text. For many readers, this simple tweak dramatically improves the experience of reading on screen.

For more information about BeeLining with SensusAccess, please visit BeeLine features.

The BeeLining with SensusAccess is offered as a separate add-on option and may not be available for all users.

Translation

Using advanced machine-learning and artificial intelligence, SensusAccess offers powerful language-to-language machine translation. Users can preselect the source language or use automated language detection. With automated language detection, the source document may even be multi-lingual.

For more information about the machine translation features offered by SensusAccess, please visit translation features.

The SensusAccess machine translation is offered as a separate add-on option and may not be available for all users.